Films To See In September 2011

September 9 – 15: The Man Who Fell To Earth (Landmark Theatre)

No way am I going to miss seeing Mr. Spaceman, David Bowie in a brand spanking new uncut 35mm print of The Man Who Fell To Earth. I’m crazy stoked for this one, but if you were to ask Filmbalaya’s own Kacey Curtis to describe this film he would say, “I’ve always held to the fervent belief that David Bowie actually is an alien from outer space. For the first hour of the film I truly believed I was watching a documentary.” Well, until proof surfaces of Bowie actually being an alien I will always hold this film in high regard as being not only one of Nicolas Roeg‘s best, but also as being a great addition to the 1970s Sci-Fi canon.

September 9: Contagion (Major)

Is it just me, or is Matt Damon starring in an impossible amount of movies lately?  The real question is: are we getting the awesome indie movie Steven Soderbergh, or the fun-but-generically-Hollywood-Ocean’s-trilogy Steven Soderbergh. Either way, the movie will be worth watching but if we get indie Soderbergh, this could be the next big Sci-Fi masterpiece.

September 11: Raiders Of The Lost Arc (Castro)

From the creator of Jaws and Star Wars comes a new adventure film starring that hot young actor, Harrison Chevy, I mean Ford.  If Ford’s character in this is as charismatic as his Han Solo character then I don’t see how I can be let down. My main concern with this film is whether or not the theme song will be catchy enough to stay in my head for the next month.  I also hope there are no snakes.  I hate snakes!

September 15: Taxi Driver/Blast Of Silence (Castro)

I no longer have to beat myself up for not picking up the Criterion Collection version of Blast of Silence when it was on sale for half off last month because I get to see it for the first time at The Castro, and as an added bonus, Taxi Driver.  Joy!

Two uncompromising studies of professionals by two directors at their masterful best; one an introverted taxi driver who enjoys talking to himself in the mirror (“Are you talking to me”), and the other a conflicted hitman just trying to get by.  I will no doubt be at the Castro for this double-feature to take in the awe in direction by Scorsese and to pop my Allen Baron cherry with Blast of Silence.

September 16: Drive (Major)

How often does an action/thriller movie win best director at Cannes?  Nicolas Winding Refn‘s latest film about a stunt driver (Ryan Gosling) who moonlights as a getaway man looks to be pleasing both crowds and critics alike. This could be one of the years best!

September 16: Aliens/Starship Troopers/Dark Star (Castro)

Merry early Christmas everybody!  Cameron, Verhoeven and Carpenter all in one spectacular night!

A triple-feature of sci-fi-tastical proportions! First up is Aliens, James Cameron‘s sequel to the classic Alien.  It’s more of an action film than its predecessor Alien, yet still delivers scares when it needs to.  For those of you who forget which Alien sequel is which like I often do, this is the one with the little girl and where the Alien rides the elevator.

Still haven’t seen Starship Troopers yet?  Really? This is Paul Verhoeven‘s crowning achievement in both camp filmmaking and propaganda satire. When was the last time you rooted for characters who are so deeply rooted in futuristic fascist morals to not be eaten by enormous space bugs?

Rounding out the triple-bill of awesomeness is John Carpenter‘s ultra low-budget feature-length directorial debut, Dark Star.  To try to explain the plot, much less the various fantastical antics that transpire, would be spoiling the campy fun.  You might be tired after sitting through two films, but I implore you to stay for Dark Star if for no other reason than to hear John Carpenter’s Casio infused musical accompaniment.

September 20: Pearl Jam Twenty (Balboa)

Painstakingly compiling footage from the last twenty years Cameron Crowe‘s latest film documents and pays tribute to one of the most solid bands from the past two decades.  I’m particularly interested in this due to my love for Pearl Jams early to mid 90s output of music. With Crowe directing, this has the potential to once again take me down that 1990’s nostalgia highway – much the way Rapaport‘s documentary on A Tribe Called Quest did earlier this year.

September 23: Moneyball (Major)

With Bennett Miller directing and Brad Pitt starring, and subject matter based on the bestseller of the same name, Moneyball has all the potential of being the next big baseball movie.  I predict the following captions being boldly displayed on movie posters worldwide upon this film’s release: “Moneyball isn’t just a hit, it’s a home run”, “Brad Pitt and Co. hit it out of the park”, and many more ultra cheesy clichéd quotes.  Smart move releasing the film at the start of the major league playoffs.

September 28: The Long Goodbye/California Split (Castro)

Aside from being known as one of Robert Altman‘s best films, The Long Goodbye also features a bit role by a pre-action hero Schwarzenegger. The film stars a cooler than cool Elliot Gould and tells the story of a detective trying to help a friend who is accused of murdering his wife. It’s my understanding that this film features lots of chain smoking and ultra hip 70s aesthetics. Why have I not seen this yet?

Also on the bill is another Altman film again starring Elliot Gould, and once again, another ultra hip 70s film. This time Gould plays a free spirited gambler. One can expect lots of gambling, booze, and casino action as well as the usual Altman touch.

September 29: The Tree Of Life (Castro)

Terrence Malick is a unique artist and displays his filmmaking ability with absolute control. If you allow this film to remove your ability to think and submit to complete dominion of your emotions, it can allow you to live through it. It is a great achievement in world cinema.

September 30: Tucker & Dale Vs Evil (Lumiere)

This is one of the best horror-comedy films I have ever seen. The film tells the tale of two hillbilllies who just want to spend some time fishing at their new vacation home in the woods.  Their week of rest and relaxation is quickly ended however, when Tucker and Dale try to save one of the college kids from drowning.  What starts out to be a good deed quickly becomes interpreted as something more sinister.  It is from this point on that the film hits full throttle, as countless miscommunications lead to some of the best situational comedy I have seen in a long time.

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Categories: Monthly Movies

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  1. David Bowie’s Newest Outer Space Adventure | How to easily play guitar - November 20, 2015

    […] Films To See In September 2011 | Filmbalaya.com http://filmbalaya.com/ … brand spanking new uncut 35mm print of The Man Who Fell To Earth. I’m crazy stoked for this one, but if you were to ask Filmbalaya’s own Kacey Curtis to describe this film he would say, “I’ve always held to the fervent belief that David Bowie actually is an alien from outer space. … From the creator of Jaws and Star Wars comes a new adventure film starring that hot young actor, Harrison Chevy, I mean Ford. If Ford’s character in this is as charismatic as his Han Solo … […]

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